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12-Aug-2018 18:50

On the other hand, it won't use protocol features not available in HTTP/1.0. it won't try to keep connection alive, and won't use chunked transfer-coding.

It's actually sending you an HTTP/1.0-compliant response.

It will not use any features such as keepalive that require HTTP/1.1.

The reason for doing this is because it's a cheap way for the server to say: This saves you an additional request in some situations.

An HTTP server MAY send a lower response version, if it is known or suspected that the client incorrectly implements the HTTP specification, but this should not be the default, and this SHOULD NOT be done if the request version is HTTP/1.1 or greater.

What this means in English is: If the client sends an HTTP/1.0 request, either an HTTP/1.0 response or HTTP/1.1 is acceptable, but HTTP/1.1 is preferred.

What are the advantage of responding HTTP 1.1 when a client request for HTTP 1.0?

(You know it in its draft form as SPDY.) No, nginx will never downgrade response version to 1.0.Bounty @Maxim Dounin, @Michael Hampton already provided an answer to the spec, thanks.I am extending this question a little bit for the future reader: Q.There's no mention of talking to the "login" URL that I could see. Internet Explorer status Win Inet, 12029 "cannot connect".

(You know it in its draft form as SPDY.) No, nginx will never downgrade response version to 1.0.Bounty @Maxim Dounin, @Michael Hampton already provided an answer to the spec, thanks.I am extending this question a little bit for the future reader: Q.There's no mention of talking to the "login" URL that I could see. Internet Explorer status Win Inet, 12029 "cannot connect". Help Desk Repair provides hardware and connectivity services for current students, and active or retired faculty and staff.